OS Schule

Five Day. End of Week In. Cleaning up a bit around the Crunch Corner. 

One of the articles [Link] waiting for reading was entitled “5 of the Best Linux Distros in 2017” and after reading it I had occasion to contemplate how I grade OS.

First of all, are they available live? That is, can I burn the OS on a DVD or USB stick and boot the computer to try the OS? If not, they grade out F–

Note that this fails both Winders and the Apple OS. They are in the buy-then-try category. And they’re the primary reason Linux exists with this and other crippling defects (like inbred susceptibility to digital cancers.)

My father had a quite narrow foot – 12AA with an AAAA heel. When he was bored on TDY he would go into shoe stores and ask to try on shoes, saying he needed several pairs. Then the clerk would have to own up to having no shoes in the store that would fit him, thus no sale and no commission for the clerk.

That was a long time ago when one could actually buy shoes that fit instead of the gunboats of today.

My similar activity is to go into a computer selling store and ask how much a computer is without Winders. When the clerk gets obnoxious, I ask for the manager’s name and social security number so I can report them for legal violations. 

If the OS boots but can’t work with the WiFi adapter and the video card in the box, then they grade out F. The article I mentioned about included two OS I tried this week: Debian 9 and Solus. Both failed this test. Yes, they could talk to the monitor but neither one could talk to the WiFi stick. 

If the OS gets a passing grade, and I like how it feels, then I install it on my test box. Then I test it for a while. The tests are fairly broad. For example, I try to see how much it degrades over time. This is where Ubuntu fails. Their LTS releases are 24 months apart but the probability of failure at 18 months is O(50%). So Ubuntu (and its clones) only gets put on machines with constipated UEFI that lock up when Secure Boot is disabled. So far the only boxes I have found with this flaw were made by HP. 

Right now I am mulling SNAPs and FLAT PACKS. At the moment I am negative, mostly due to their overhead and the state of ISPism in the hinterland. I have mentioned earlier that in the summer – when the bairns are unleashed from schule – I have to do updates at night because they – the bairns – hawg the bandwidth so much. The problem is that most of Amerika, outside the megametropolises, has stercus for bandwidth. All courtesy of capitalists, of course.

So why do I want a software store that offers me no bandwidth benefit if I have the OS installed? That’s the question no one seems to want to address, much less answer. Most of my updates are a few Mb. Most of the new programs I add, even with additional supporting SW, are a few MB. So why do I want those to climb to Gb? Odor of rattus.

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