Day of the Linux Spanner

Five Day. End of gym for the week. Accompanied by the unpleasant nattering that the gym will close One Day next for a holiday. Any excuse. Everybody else will go about their business, with an interruption to observe the reason, but otherwise the holiday is not an excuse for non-service.

This is what happens when one lives in the Old Confederacy, in a small town. The people generally think themselves exceptional when they are actually mediocre to defective and use any excuse to avoid effort. 

Reminds me of the latter days of the Roman Empire when chariot races and bread donatives were more important than effort. 

We have become addicted, at least in most places and of most people, to avoiding effort and productivity. No wonder jobs are scarce and disappearing. Robots are better workers and soon to be smarter as well. Makes me glad I am ORF so I don’t have to worry about the political oligarchs implementing the Irish Solution.

On which azimuth, I noted yesterday an article [Link] entitled “Why Linux has Failed on the Desktop.” I should warn the reader that the author of this article is a journalist and not a knowledgeable human.

The thesis is that Linux has failed on the desktop. That is intriguing and so I picked up the article to see what insight might be present.

There wasn’t much.

The article starts by blasting the propaganda of the Linux capitalists that this is “The Year of the Linux Desktop” repeatedly for several years. Somehow he fails to note who is saying this: people who sell Linux services. 

Then he makes a series of arguments that basically come down to: Linux is too difficult for all those folks who wait about for chariot races and bread.

The sad part is that much of his arguments against are actually arguments for the success of the Linux desktop. Specifically elitism, given that elitism is personal standards, productivity, creativity, and learning. In this regard the standards of contemporary journalism are marvelously upheld.

Yes, Linux is elitist. If competency is elitist. Yes, it helps to think like a “developer” to use Linux. It helps to think like a surgeon to do heart transplants. Or like a mechanic to fix motorcars. When I was growing up reading Popular Mechanics and Popular Science and they were full of do-it-yourself projects one of the currents was the need (and how) to think to do the project, be it carpentry or plumbing or soldering. 

The problem is not that you have to think like a computer geek to use a computer; the problem is that you don’t. That’s the difference between a tool and an appliance. And if you can make do with an appliance, well and good; you don’t have to think computer. But if you need a tool, you need to think like a tool user or you’ll end up needing someone who thinks like a physician. (Worse Case, admittedly.)

The people who want to make lots of money selling Linux are the only ones who give any credence to the “Year of the Linux Desktop” catch phrase as anything other than that. People who believe this are the same ones who eat daily at fast food troughs and think MalWart is a benevolent employer. Television before Thought. 

The people who actually use Linux, whether as server or desktop software, are worried about the quality of their tools, not the sound of the beep on their appliances. 

But I do have to worry about the folks who drink the koolaid and criticize the sippy cup.

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