Self-Examination 1

No, this blot is not about tactiling one’s body parts. It’s about a mental self-examination. The first in what may be a series.

I seem to fundamentally be a reader. When I was a child television was stercus, especially in Alibam, and I learned to read at four. By adolescence I had read every obvious book in the house (my father’s dirty magazine collection was covert) and was raiding the Carnegie library thrice a week. And that ending was delayed by a year spent plowing through my father’s correspondence course textx from his navy days. Sic Transit Algebra et Trigonometry.

But I came to the conjecture that reading is my natural (?) mode of learning when the internet ripened and videos proliferated. When I was in high schule and college I abided films, mostly as entertainment but never as anything substantive. In fact, I mostly assumed the film was a means for the teacher/lecturer to stand down.

When TED came along I tried it because I knew several of the speakers and knew they were good.

But they weren’t. They were bad. Disengaging and stuffy. And the ones by people I didn’t know were worse. Absolutely painful and boring. I thought it might be the restrictive format rules imposed. Surely these people aren’t really boring.

But this morning I found an article [Link] entitled “Top 10 Smart Alternatives to TED Talks” on LifeHacker. It proclaims it’s a review of sites for people who can’t stand TED. Are other people downed by TED?

So I did the Rikki Tiki Tavi thing; I went and looked see. And it was terrible. None were engaging. None were learnable. Other than that I should not spend any precious time on them.

So I can only hypothesize that I am a fairly monochannel learner.

Alas. 

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