Major Psychology

One day. Back to gym. Not bad. Passable podcast episode on C. S. Lewis. Intriguing arguments never used by most old Confederacy preachers and christianist. And hence, incorrect because they are the only. 

I ran across an article [Link] entitled “What does your college major say about your personality? ” This is sort of a Bose Condensation type of argument from psychologists. But what gathered my attention was a categorization by major:

  • Science students scored high for openness and extraversion, and medium for neuroticism
  • Engineering students tended to have medium levels of neuroticism and conscientiousness, and low openness scores
  • Arts/humanities majors scored high in openness and neuroticism, and low for conscientiousness
  • Law students were highly extraverted, rated medium for neuroticism and conscientiousness, but scored low on openness and agreeableness. Economics students ranked similar
  • Medical students also scored high on extraversion, but were highly agreeable, too
  • Psychology students rated high for neuroticism and openness

I cannot refrain from making comments.

  • Physicists: extroversion? Not in my experience. Open? Yes. But extrovert? Only among those who specialize in outreach. Which does not say they are not smart, but they don’t get along with the majority. And neurotic? Being physicist means being different, especially from the BOGs. So what is that if not a perceived neurosis?
  • Engineer students are intense, or were in my day. 
  • Arts and humanities students are moved by inner truths that involve much social meandering, especially with drugs.
  • Law students are cunning and crafty and overweeningly ambitious. Winning and money are root.
  • I can’t speak to actual medical students since medical schools tend to be segregated – for a reason. Pre-meds are worse than pre-laws for asociality (except for self-service) and ambition. 
  • My cousin, a psychology professor, told me that most students studying psychology were “physician heal thyself.”

Selah.

 

 

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