Identical but for Lies

Once more into the boundary between out and in, and once more adult supervision. FD SCP has ended her work week and I am already smarting under the onus of her projects. The park was a bit low in warmth this morning but not from a wind. Not quite comfortable and the necessary bundling seemed excessive for what the thermometer proclaimed. I tried out a new Linux podcast and was disappointed, which probably contributed to the ill ease. Not that it is a bad ‘cast, just that it is a style not amenable fully to me. 

On those azimuths, several thoughts. I have been watching the political races in Alibam increasing in heat. I have a great interest in the guvnuh race since it is really a good versus good failing and being evil race. The latter is the incumbent who found ways to grease the pockets of cronies but not provide medical care. That latter is still a repudenialist tactic, of taking an opponent’s good and making it seem bad. This is particularly the case with the attorney general race. If we go on positive aspects – what the candidates are for – then the two are indistinguishable to a confidence level of 0.95 which is the standard statistical goodness for bogs. 

I should comment that the bogs don’t understand that – heck!, I don’t understand it fully but that’s because statisticians are a special subspecies of nerd – but the parrotage they are taught in college stats classes – and then promptly repress – is o.95 (or 0.05 which is the same) confidence level. And I will insert the snideism that that confidence level is on the posing of the situation, not its actuality. At least, not always.

But getting back to the attorney general candidates, the two are essentially the same on what they are; the difference is in what they say the other is. The incumbent is claimed to be incompetent and the toady of monied interests – what politician isn’t? – while the challenger is claimed to be incompetent if elected because of – good political logic here – twisting good things done into evil and bad. We can only worry if the same goes of the incumbent. 

I don’t expect my concerns to be resolved. An article [Link] in IO9 shows the restrictiveness of state voting laws:

Alibam is notably one of the most restrictive states. In fact, voting in many ways is more restrictive than in the days of poll taxes when money was openly paid to purchase votes. 

The real lesson is about society. Individual voters are well aware that they are being deceived and prevaricated. But they vote for the evil anyway because with the partisan system there are no alternatives. And in Alibam, there is really no difference between the parties. Except which lies they throw about each other.

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